Our bioenergy plants

Renewable electricity & heat

We have long used residues from forestry and agriculture in many of our power plants. Now, our power plants use residues primarily in the form of straw, wood pellets and wood chips, saving millions of tonnes of carbon emissions per year. 

Our seven central bioenergy power plants, produce electricity & district heating. There is also one heat plant and one peak load plant. All our bioenergy plants are constantly developed, maintained and modernised to produce power and heat as efficiently as possible and with the least amount of environmental impact.


Our power plants
Avedøre, combined heat and power station  
Asnæs, combined heat and power station
Esbjerg, combined heat and power station
H.C. Ørsted, combined heat and power station
Herning, combined heat and power station
Kyndby, peak load plant
Skærbæk, combined heat and power station
Studstrup, combined heat and power station
Svanemølle, heat plant

Avedøre, combined heat and power station


Ørsted is among the world leaders in relation to design, construction and operation of efficient and modern power stations.

By producing electricity and heat simultaneously, our multi-fuel power station, Avedøre, utilises up to 89 % of the energy in the fuels.

Download a brochure about the Avedøre station

Avedøre Power Station

Asnæs, combined heat and power station

The Asnæs power plant is located on Zealand by Kalundborg inlet and is one of the green power plants of the future. It supplies green sustainable district heating to the city of Kalundborg and process energy to Novo Nordisk and Novozymes, as well as electricity on the basis of certified sustainable wood chips.

The Asnæs CHP is expected to produce district heating based on biomass corresponding to around 15,000 Danish households’ annual consumption and process energy for two of Kalundborg's largest industrial companies, as well as green electricity corresponding to over 20,000 households' annual consumption.

Esbjerg, combined heat and power station


The Esbjerg CHP station is located in Jutland (Esbjerg area), and consists of one unit (Unit 3), which can switch between 100% coal and 100% fuel oil. The plant is one of two main suppliers of district heating to the Esbjerg area. 



H.C. Ørsted, combined heat and power station


H.C. Ørsted CHP station, situated at Sydhavnen in Copenhagen, was commissioned in 1920 and was at that time the largest power station in Denmark.

Herning, combined heat and power station


In 2009, it was rebuilt to a 100 % CO2-neutral production based on biomass fuels.

The plant produces 88MW of power and 171MJ/s of district heating, and is able to burn wood chips and wood pellets, with natural gas as reserve fuel. Wood chips make up about 70 % of Herning Power Station fuel while wood pellets represented approx. 30 %.

Kyndby, peak load plant


Kyndby Power Station in Hornsherred is the emergency and peak load facility for Zealand.

This means the facilities at Kyndby Power Station can be started up within minutes if operational irregularities occur in the high voltage electricity grid or problems arise at other power stations.

Kyndby Power Station

Skærbæk, combined heat and power station


Since 1951 it has been situated at Skærbæk on the northern side of Kolding Fjord. From 2014 to 2017 Skærbæk CHP station was converted making it able to use wood chips instead of natural gas. 

The CHP station produces district heating based on biomass for around 60,000 homes in the Triangle Region in Denmark.

Studstrup, combined heat and power station


From 2014 to 2016, Studstrup CHP station’s unit 3 was converted making it able to use wood pellets instead of coal. The conversion makes Studstrup CHP station one of the biggest biomass-fuelled power stations in the world. 

It produces district heating based on biomass for around 106,000 Danish homes as well as green electricity equivalent to the annual consumption of around 230,000 Danish homes.

Svanemølle, heat plant


Svanemølle heat plant is situated at Nordhavn in Copenhagen and was previously a coal-fired CHP plant but was converted to natural gas and oil firing in 1985.

Today it is a heat plant and its primary task is to supply district heating to the Greater Copenhagen district-heating network.

Renescience

To turn our waste into something we can re-use. That is exactly what Renescience technology does.